Tuesday, 17 March 2020

Capital Celluloid Update

In the last 24 hours there have been announcements of the temporary closures of the ICA, BFI Southbank, Picturehouse Cinemas, Odeon and also Vue. In the current situation with uncertainty surrounding screenings the most prudent thing is to suspend listings other than those still known to be going ahead. Keep safe and look forward to bringing you the best of the repertory London film scene when it’s wise to do so.


Monday, 16 March 2020

Capital Celluloid 2020 — Day 85: Wed Mar 25

REGENT STREET CINEMA HAS CLOSED OWING TO THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK AND THIS EVENT AND ALL FUTURE SCREENINGS HAVE BEEN CANCELLED OR POSTPONED. FOR FULL DETAILS YOU CAN CLICK HERE.


Stardust (Apted, 1974): Regent Street Cinema, 7.30pm



This Heavenly Films screening will followed by a Q&A with writer Ray Connolly hosted by Travis Elborough.

Time Out review:
Enjoyable attempt at the impossible task of reflecting the whole sprawl of '60s British pop through the rise and fall of one rock star. Ray Connolly's script for this sequel to That'll Be the Day functions on numerous levels: as a piece of nostalgia for over 25s; as wish fulfilment for David Essex's teenage fans, in which he becomes the greatest rock'n'roll singer in the world; and, God help us, as a would-be art movie, with its central relationship between Essex's singer and roadie Adam Faith more than reminiscent of The Servant. The script is at its best when knocking the stuffing out of the music industry and its myths, less successful when asking us to believe in the fictional achievements of its central character (3,000,000 fans and a Time magazine cover). Best are Adam FaithKeith Moon's anarchic performance, and Dave Edmunds' music.
Chris Peachment

Here (and above) is an extract.

Capital Celluloid 2020 — Day 84: Tue Mar 24

The continuing Coronavirus situation means there are going to be gaps in the schedules and this is one such date when there are currently no repertory screenings scheduled at present. Once films are booked for this particular evening, details will be made available here.

Sunday, 15 March 2020

Capital Celluloid 2020 — Day 83: Mon Mar 23

PICTUREHOUSE CINEMAS HAVE CLOSED OWING TO THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK AND THIS EVENT AND ALL FUTURE SCREENINGS HAVE BEEN CANCELLED OR POSTPONED. FOR FULL DETAILS YOU CAN CLICK HERE.


Dune (Lynch, 1984): Picturehouse Central, 6.15pm



This film is being shown at a number of Picturehouse cinemas across London and the rest of the country. Find the details here.

Chicago Reader review:
If this 1984 film really cost $60 million, producer Dino De Laurentiis must be the greatest patron of avant-garde cinema since the Vicomte de Noailles financed Buñuel's L'Age d'Or. Director David Lynch thoroughly (and perhaps inadvertently) subverts the adolescent inanities of Frank Herbert's plot by letting the narrative strangle itself in unnecessary complications, leaving the field clear to imagery as disturbing as anything in Eraserhead. The problem is that the imagery—as Sadean as Pasolini's Salo—isn't rooted in any story impulse, and so its power dissipates quickly. The real venue for this film is either a grind house or the Whitney Museum; its passage through the shopping malls of America was a once-in-a-lifetime anomaly. Kyle MacLachlan is the pallid hero who becomes a messiah to an oppressed desert tribe.
Dave Kehr

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2020 — Day 82: Sun Mar 22

THE PRINCE CHARLES CINEMA HAS CLOSED OWING TO THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK AND THIS EVENT AND ALL FUTURE SCREENINGS HAVE BEEN CANCELLED OR POSTPONED. FOR FULL DETAILS YOU CAN CLICK HERE.


Gloria (Cassavettes, 1980): Prince Charles Cinema, 8.45pm


This presentation is part of the ‘Cassavetes on 35mm’ season. Full details here.

Chicago Reader review:
John Cassavetes clearly set out to make a commercial film, but, intransigent personality that he was, he turned in a slice of pure avant-garde: this 1980 release makes use of a fascinating discrepancy between dramatic tone and visual style. It's written as a soggy, conventional melodrama, about an ex-gun moll (Gena Rowlands) who tries to protect an orphaned Puerto Rican boy from the mob, but it's directed in Cassavetes's usual style of deflated naturalism. While the script pitches a series of wildly improbable events, the direction remains disruptively attuned to the dark, arrhythmic poetry of anticlimax. Heightened emotion and nagging banal reality fight each other for screen space, doing final battle in a daringly ambiguous ending.
Dave Kehr

Here (and) above is the trailer.

Saturday, 14 March 2020

Capital Celluloid 2020 — Day 81: Sat Mar 21

EVERYMAN CINEMAS ARE CLOSED OWING TO THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK AND THIS EVENT AND ALL FUTURE SCREENINGS HAVE BEEN CANCELLED OR POSTPONED. FOR THE FULL DETAILS YOU CAN CLICK HERE.


Leaving Las Vegas (Figgis, 1995): Everyman Screen on the Green, 11.30pm


This film is the highlight of the late-night Nicolas Cage season at the Everyman Islington Screen on the Green. Here are the full details of the season.

Time Out review:
Alcoholic scriptwriter Ben (Nicolas Cage) is blowing his options. Our first glimpse sees his beyond-niceties collaring of an agent friend in a smart restaurant to demand drink money, a symptomatic preamble to what's staring him in the face: a 'sadly, we have to let you go' dismissal from his studio job. Figgis sets the crap game running here: the pay-off finances a one-way ticket to oblivion or, to give hell its name, Las Vegas, city of permanent after-hours. Cash the cheque, burn the past, take the freeway - we're in the booze movie, that most fascinatingly flawed form of the modern urban tragedy. This modestly budget masterpiece pools the Vegas streets with reflected neon and watches Ben drown. Elizabeth Shue is good as the young hooker he falls for, but Cage is extraordinary, producing an Oscar-winning performance of edgy, utterly convincing suicidal auto-destruct. In fact, Figgis makes of him something of an existential saint, a man for whom terminal self-knowledge leads to a kind of grace. If the film lacks the depth and structural sophistication of, say, The Lost Weekend (it was shot fast, with Declan Quinn's saturated Super-16 photography blown up, which may explain its kinetic buzz), it certainly has the courage of its convictions.

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Friday, 13 March 2020

Capital Celluloid 2020 — Day 80: Fri Mar 20

CLOSE UP CINEMA HAS STOPPED SCREENINGS OWING TO THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK AND THIS EVENT AND ALL FUTURE SCREENINGS HAVE BEEN CANCELLED OR POSTPONED. FOR FULL DETAILS YOU CAN CLICK HERE.

Possession (Zulawski, 1981): Close-Up Cinema, 8.15pm


Chicago Reader review:
Andrzej Zulawski's 1981 masterpiece opens with the messy separation of a middle-class couple (Sam Neill, Isabelle Adjani), then goes on to imagine various catastrophic breakdowns—of interpersonal relationships, social order, and ultimately narrative logic itself. The film can be hilarious one moment and terrifying the next, and Zulawski's roving camera only heightens the sense of unpredictability. Few movies convey so viscerally what it's like to go mad: when this takes an unexpected turn into supernatural horror, the development feels inevitable, as though the characters had been bracing themselves for it all along. Adjani won the best actress prize at Cannes for her dual performance (as an unfaithful wife and her angelic doppelganger), but the whole cast is astonishing, exorcising painful feelings with an intensity that rivals that of the filmmaking. Performed in English and shot in Berlin by an international crew, this also conveys a sense of displacement that's always been crucial to Zulawski's work.
Ben Sachs


Here (and above) is the trailer.