Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 103: Fri Apr 14

Effi Briest (Fassbinder, 1974): BFI Southbank, NFT2, 8.50pm


The excellent Rainer Werner Fassbinder season continues at the BFI Southbank with this screening. Full details here. Tonight's film can also be seen at BFI Southbank on April 19th . You can find all the information here.

Chicago Reader review:
Rainer Werner Fassbinder's 1974 film of Fontane's 19th-century social novel is an interesting experiment with shifting narrative forms, moving from the compulsive psychological realism of its source to Brechtian distancing devices, often in the same scene. The slow, deliberate pace is sometimes taxing, but this story of a 16-year-old girl locked in the boredom of a loveless marriage is perfectly suited to Fassbinder's stifling mise-en-scene. With Hanna Schygulla and Wolfgang Schenck.
Dave Kehr 

Here (and above) is an extract.

Saturday, 25 March 2017

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 102: Thu Apr 13

The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant (Fassbinder, 1972): BFI Southbank, NFT1, 8.30pm


The excellent Rainer Werner Fassbinder season continues at the BFI Southbank with this screening. Full details here. Tonight's film can also be seen at BFI Southbank on April 17th and 24th. You can find all the information here.

Chicago Reader review:
A lesbian love triangle becomes a schema of sexual power plays in Rainer Werner Fassbinder's most harshly stylized and perhaps most significant film (1972). The action is confined to a single set—the apartment of fashion designer Margit Carstensen, decorated with desiccated mannequins and a mammoth painting of fleshy, galloping nudes—where the three characters (one is a mute) scheme, complain, and attempt to seduce. With Irm Hermann and Hanna Schygulla.
Dave Kehr

Here (and above) is an extract. 

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 101: Wed Apr 12

Beware of a Holy Whore (Fassbinder, 1971): BFI Southbank, NFT3, 6.10pm


The excellent Rainer Werner Fassbinder season continues at the BFI Southbank with this screening. Full details of the season here. Tonight's screening is introduced by season programmer Margaret Deriaz.

Chicago Reader review:
Rainer Werner Fassbinder's 1970 film about a movie crew trapped in a Spanish seaside hotel, waiting first for the star (Eddie Constantine) to arrive and then for the director (Lou Castel) to find his inspiration. This edgy, violent, impacted movie was based on incidents that occurred during the shooting of Fassbinder's Whity, and survivors claim that it more or less accurately records the paranoia and desperate needfulness that reigned on Fassbinder's sets. It was also the last film of his ragged avant-gardist period; with the subsequent Ali: Fear Eats the Soul, he moved into an emulation of a Hollywood director's distance and control. With Hanna Schygulla, Ulli Lommel, and Magdalena Montezuma.
Dave Kehr

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 100: Tue Apr 11

The Merchant of Four Seasons (Fassbinder, 1971): BFI Southbank, NFT3, 8.50pm


The excellent Rainer Werner Fassbinder season continues at the BFI Southbank with this screening. Full details here. Tonight's film can also be seen at BFI Southbank on April 16th and 28th. You can find all the information here.

Chicago Reader review:
Rainer Werner Fassbinder has a genius for detailing the pain of suppressed emotional states, and even at its most achingly deliberate, his style in dealing with the petit bourgeois mentality is a source of endless fascination. This 1971 feature, originally shot for German television, chronicles the struggles of a fruit peddler to build a semblance of a life for himself and his wife—with whom he maintains only the barest contact—in postwar Germany. With Hans Hirschmuller, Irm Hermann, and Hanna Schygulla.
Don Druker

Here (and above) is an extract.

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 99: Mon Apr 10

Threads (Jackson, 1984): Barbican Cinema, 8.45pm


This film is part of the 'What London watches: Ten Films That Shook Our World' season at the Barbican. You can find the full details here.

Barbican introduction:
A devastating speculative account of the effects of a nuclear attack on Sheffield at the onset of World War III, BBC drama Threads was nominated for seven BAFTA awards after its 1984 release.  Preparing for their marriage, Jimmy and Ruth (Reece Dinsdale and Karen Meagher) are almost oblivious to the international political tensions caused by the USSR’s invasion of Iran. But when Sheffield – home to vast resources and an RAF base – is bombed by a thermonuclear device, they must learn to survive as their home is turned into a desolate wasteland. Probably one of the most authentic portrayals of nuclear winter onscreen, Threads is horrifying and fascinating, brutal and powerful – a stark warning to humanity of the real, human effects of nuclear war.

Here is Guardian Film critic Peter Bradshaw's take in the newspaper's .Horror: the film that frightened me most. series.

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 98: Sun Apr 9

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (Lynch, 1992): Curzon Soho, 3pm


This is the fifth screening in the Curzon Soho Enthusiasm season, dedicated to screening from prints. Here is the cinema's introduction to the event (full details here):

Following on from our ‘Hollywood Babylon’ double–bill of Rabbit's Moon and Lost Highway back in February, ENTHUSIASM returns to the sun-bleached driveways of Los Angeles with a special 16mm presentation of Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid’s landmark experimental film Meshes of the Afternoon (1943) - followed by a rare 35mm screening of David Lynch’s misunderstood masterpiece Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992).

Panned at the time of release by the mainstream critics, this is one of Lynch's finest works and a film that has grown in reputation over the years.

Time Out review:
'A bleak, heartrending study of familial abuse, teenage desperation and small-town claustrophobia, it's certainly David Lynch's most emotionally extreme film, and perhaps his most heartfelt and sympathetic. The score by Angelo Badalamenti is one of the finest in recent memory, and the cast are astonishing.'
Tom Huddleston

You can read a more expansive review by Huddleston at the notcoming.com website here.
Here's a flavour: 'This blending of the absurd and the horrifying to dreamlike and disturbing effect has become Lynch’s hallmark, from the chickens in Eraserhead to the hobo behind the diner in Mulholland Drive. Nowhere else in his work does he use the technique as effectively as in Fire Walk With Me. Sudden tonal shifts from joy or security to overwhelming sadness, unease, terror and back again are perhaps the film’s most effective emotional weapons, and Lynch deploys them mercilessly.'

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Friday, 24 March 2017

Capital Celluloid 2017 - Day 97: Sat Apr 8

The Passenger (Antonioni, 1975): Curzon Bloomsbury, 3pm


Q&A screening: A panel discussion will follow the screening featuring David Levitt of Levitt Bernstein architects who worked closely on the Brunswick Centre with the late Patrick Hodgkinson and anthropologist and broadcaster Farrah Jarral, who recently wrote and presented the 10-part series BBC Radio 4 series From Savage to Self. Further guests to be announced.

This screening is held to coincide with Passengers, a site-specific exhibition series based at the Brunswick Centre that brings together artists that have an interest in the real and imaginative environments we construct and inhabit. A tour of the exhibition is also offered to interested guests after the screening and discussion - See more here. Passengers brings together artists that have an interest in the real and imaginative environments we construct and inhabit. The title references the 1975 film The Passenger by Michelangelo Antonioni that uses the Brunswick as a powerful and otherworldly mise-en-scène.

Chicago Reader review:
A masterpiece, one of Michelangelo Antonioni's finest works (1975). Jack Nicholson and Maria Schneider star as a journalist who trades one identity for another and the woman who becomes his accomplice (and ultimately the moral center of his adopted world). Less a thriller (though the mood of mystery is pervasive) than a meditation on the problems of knowledge, action for its own sake, and the relationship of the artist to the work he brings into being. Next to this film, Blowup seems a facile, though necessary, preliminary. By all means go.
Don Druker

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Q&A screening: A panel discussion will follow the screening featuring David Levitt of Levitt Bernstein architects who worked closely on The Brunswick Centre with the late Patrick Hodgkinson and Anthropologist and Broadcaster Farrah Jarral who recently wrote and presented the 10 part series BBC Radio 4 series From Savage to Self. Further guests to be announced. Saturday 8 April 3.00pm, Bloomsbury This screening is held to coincide with Passengers, a site-specific exhibition series based at the Brunswick Centre that brings together artists that have an interest in the real and imaginative environments we construct and inhabit. A tour of the exhibition is also offered to interested guests after the screening and discussion. - See more at: https://www.curzoncinemas.com/bloomsbury/film-info/the-passenger#sthash.MILUXP1s.dpuf