Friday, 10 August 2018

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 226: Fri Aug 24

Mildred Pierce (Curtiz, 1945): BFI Southbank, NFT3, 8.45pm



This 4K revival is on an extended run at BFI Southbank from August 17th (full details here) and is part of the Joan Crawford season at the cinema (you can find all the films and events here).

Time Out review:
James Cain's novel of the treacherous life in Southern California that sets house-wife-turned waitress-turned-successful restauranteur (Joan Crawford) against her own daughter (Ann Blyth) in competition for the love of playboy Zachary Scott, is brought fastidiously and bleakly to life by Michael Curtiz' direction, Ernest Haller's camerawork, and Anton Grot's magnificent sets. Told in flashback from the moment of Scott's murder, the film is a chilling demonstration of the fact that, in a patriarchal society, when a woman steps outside the home the end result may be disastrous.

Phil
 Hardy

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Thursday, 9 August 2018

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 225: Thu Aug 23

Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom (Pasolini, 1975): Genesis Cinema, 6.30pm


Genesis Cinema introduction: Our monthly screening with Nick Walker of Rochester Kino returns with a 35mm presentation of Pier Paolo Pasolini's adaptation of Marquis de Sade's 120 Days of Sodom, or Salo. The screening will be introduced by Nick and will be followed by a salon discussion upstairs at the bar.

Chicago Reader review:
Pier Paolo Pasolini's last feature (1975) is a shockingly literal and historically questionable transposition of the Marquis de Sade's 
120 Days of Sodom
 to the last days of Italian fascism. Most of the film consists of long shots of torture, though some viewers have been more upset by the bibliography that appears in the credits. Roland Barthes noted that in spite of all its objectionable elements (he pointed out that any film that renders Sade real and fascism unreal is doubly wrong), this film should be defended because it "refuses to allow us to redeem ourselves." It's certainly the film in which Pasolini's protest against the modern world finds its most extreme and anguished expression. Very hard to take, but in its own way an essential work.
Jonathan Rosenbaum


Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 224: Wed Aug 22

Dog Day Afternoon (Lumet, 1975): Prince Charles Cinema, 8.45pm


This 35mm presentation is part of the Unicorn Nights strand at the Prince Charles Cinema. You can find full details of the season here.

Chicago Reader review:
One of Sidney Lumet's best jobs of directing (1975) and one of Al Pacino's best performances (as a bisexual bank robber) come together in a populist thriller with lots of New York juice. Its details are stronger than its structure—the film loses some of its energy before the end—but it's an astonishing fusion of suspense and character, powered by superior ensemble acting. With John Cazale, Charles Durning, Sully Boyar, James Broderick, Chris Sarandon, and Carol Kane.
Jonathan Rosenbaum


Here (and above) is the trailer.

Friday, 3 August 2018

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 223: Tue Aug 21

The Marquise of O (Rohmer, 1976): Close-Up Cinema, 7.30pm


This screening is part of the Rohmer season at Close-Up Cinema. Full details here.

Chicago Reader review:
Eric Rohmer's detailed, infinitely subtle 1976 retelling of a Heinrich von Kleist story about an Italian aristocrat who discovers, unaccountably, that she's pregnant. Rohmer deals with grand passions—love and hate, dignity and humility, forgiveness and contrition—but in an understated way that makes the emotion seem that much more true. The film's slow, stately pace and the quiet way in which it makes its points give it the aura of a neoclassical dream, a fading vision of the virtue of gentility. With Edith Clever and Bruno Ganz.
Dave Kehr


Here (and above) is the trailer.

Sunday, 29 July 2018

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 222: Mon Aug 20

Accident (Losey, 1967): BFI Southbank, Studio, 8.50pm


This film, which is part of the Pinter season (full details here), is also screened on August 1st and 10th (full details here).

Chicago Reader review:
Joseph Losey's coldly funny puzzle movie (1967), about the erotic entanglements of Oxford as superbly entangled by scenarist Harold Pinter. Dirk Bogarde's crumbling don is the sharpest of the many similar performances he has given, and Stanley Baker is superbly chunky as Bogarde's rival for a young Austrian student (Jacqueline Sassard). With Vivien Merchant, Michael York, Delphine Seyrig, and Alexander Knox.

Dave Kehr

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 221: Sun Aug 19

Reunion (Schatzberg, 1989): BFI Southbank, NFT3, 8.10pm


This 35mm screening, which is part of the Pinter season (full details here), is also screened on August 31st (full details here).

Chicago Reader review:
Jerry Schatzberg 1989 picture, a French-English-West German production, is one of his very best, Adapted by Harold Pinter from a novel by Fred Uhlman, and shot in 'Scope by Bruno De Keyzer, it tells the story of a New York Jewish lawyer (Jason Robards) returning to Stuttgart, Germany, after a 55-year absence to discover what happened during the early 30s to his best friend (Samuel West)—an ambassador's son who didn't share the racism of his aristocratic family. What's impressive about the tale's unfolding (most of it told in flashback, with Christien Anholt as the hero as a youth) is the meticulous re-creation of Germany during the rise of Nazism (the superb production design is by the great Alexandre Trauner, who appears in a cameo in a warehouse office), as well as a sensitive (and perhaps timely) depiction of how the gradual changes in national thinking were reflected in everyday life. It's all been done before, but seldom with such feeling for detail and nuance; one has to adjust to the curious mix between English dialogue and street signs in German, but the performances—by Francoise Fabian, Maureen Kerwin, Barbara Jefford, and Bert Parnaby in addition to the leads—are impeccable.

Jonathan Rosenbaum


Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2018 - Day 220: Sat Aug 18

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (Hooper, 1974): Prince Charles Cinema, 6.50pm


This 35mm print is being screened on the date of the massacre.

Chicago Reader review:
Tobe Hooper's 1974 bloodbath cheapie acquired a considerable reputation among ideologically oriented critics, who admired the film's sneaky equation of middle-class values with cannibalism and wholesale slaughter. The plot, such as it is, concerns a group of teenagers who fall into the hands—and knives, and ultimately chain saws—of a backwoods family of homicidal maniacs. The picture gets to you more through its intensity than its craft, but Hooper does have a talent.
Dave Kehr

Here (and above) is the trailer.