Sunday, 11 September 2016

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 289: Sun Oct 16

Private Property (Stevens, 1960): Prince Charles Cinema, 8.45pm


60th LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (5th-16th October 2016) DAY 11
 
Every day (from October 5th to October 16th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

This film also screens at the LFF on October 8th. Details here.

Chicago Reader review:
Released in 1960—the same year as Psycho and Michael Powell's Peeping Tom—this pervy low-budget thriller stars Corey Allen and a babyish Warren Oates as drifters who arrive in LA, follow a statuesque blond (Kate Manx) back to her home in the Hollywood Hills, and spy on her from the vacant house next door, waiting for the right moment to rape her. Leslie Stevens, a TV writer directing his debut feature, pays homage to Hitchcock in the dialogue and, in like fashion, gives his heroine a complicating psychological wrinkle: neglected by her workaholic husband and starved for attention, she's easy prey when Allen's character, a smooth-talking menace, appears at her door posing as a down-and-out landscaper. Stevens shot the movie in ten days at his own home, casting his wife in the lead and drawing a gentle, appealing performance from Manx in her first big-screen role. He would go on to create the sci-fi anthology series The Outer Limits; she would divorce him and commit suicide at age 34.
JR Jones 

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 288: Sat Oct 15

Daughters of the Dust (Dash, 1991): Vue West End, Leicester Square, Screen 5, 12.30pm


60th LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (5th-16th October 2016) DAY 11
 
Every day (from October 5th to October 16th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

This film also screens at the LFF on October 8th. Details here.

LFF introduction:

Julie Dash’s majestic first feature is a poignant portrait of three generations of Gullah women (descendants of West African slaves) at the turn of the 20th century as their family struggle with the decision to migrate from their sea island home off the coast of South Carolina to the mainland. Daughters portrayed a new type of blackness and black identity – one located in a pastoral island setting still informed by myth and ancestral traditions. Dash’s perspective is determinedly feminist as she fuses together image, sound, authentic dialect and traditions of African oral storytelling to portray the power, beauty, and resilience of black women. Her vision and aesthetic sensibilities perfectly capture a forgotten moment of the African American experience and charts new ground in the representation of black women on screen. One of the key inspirations for the film work that accompanied BeyoncĂ©’s Lemonade, this is a timely re-release for Dash’s powerful film.
Karen Alexander

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 287: Fri Oct 14

The Informer (Robison, 1929): BFI Southbank, NFT1, 6.30pm


60th LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (5th-16th October 2016) DAY 10
 
Every day (from October 5th to October 16th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

LFF introduction:
Liam O’Flaherty’s 1925 novel about betrayal amidst the chaotic political and revolutionary environment of the newly independent Ireland of 1922 was famously adapted for the screen by John Ford. This earlier, silent adaptation is arguably finer, bringing to bear the best of late 1920s European filmmaking, but with one foot in the 1930s. O’Flaherty claimed that he wrote The Informer as a ‘high-brow detective story’ that was ‘based on the technique of the cinema’. Director Robison’s approach, emphasising the sense of claustrophobia and playing up the chiaroscuro, anticipates the mood of later film noir thrillers. German cinematographers Brandes and Sparkuhl make the most of the A-list international stars, Lars Hanson and the languorously beautiful Lya de Putti. Dublin is convincingly realised – one virtuoso tracking shot takes you from a rooftop down to a bustling street as it follows Gypo Nolan (Hanson), elbowing his way through the crowd, on his way to inform on his friend. Love and loyalty struggle to survive the consequences of his action.

Bryony Dixon 

Here (and above) is an extract.

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 286: Thu Oct 13

Memories of Underdevelopment 35mm (Alea, 1968): BFI Southbank, NFT3, 6.15pm


60th LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (5th-16th October 2016) DAY 9
 
Every day (from October 5th to October 16th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

Chicago Reader review:
Adapted by Cuban filmmaker Tomas Gutierrez Alea from Edmundo Desnoe's novel Inconsolable Memories, this 1969 film portrays the alienation of a bourgeois intellectual caught in the warp of a rapidly changing social reality. A thoroughly mature and original creation, Alea's film does not caricature Sergio—a 28-year-old living off reparations from his nationalized property—but rather strikingly portrays the existential contradictions of a man living in a vacuum, in a mixture of past and present, whose only response to the missile crisis is to watch it through binoculars while his more intellectually authentic (if less well schooled) countrymen respond with action. Told from Sergio's viewpoint, the film is a call to continued action for Cubans and an engrossing psychological portrait.

Don Druker

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 285: Wed Oct 12

Porto (Klinger, 2016) 35mm: BFI Southbank, NFT1, 9.15pm



60th LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (5th-16th October 2016) DAY 8
 
Every day (from October 5th to October 16th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

This film is also being screened at the LFF on October 14th and 15th. Details here.

LFF introduction:
A location where every frame seems imbued with a lingering romantic pessimism, Porto is the setting for the end, the start and the reminiscence of a love affair between American drifter Jake and French archaeologist Mati. By turns sexy and sad, the film shows the damage that their momentary connection helps them transcend, as well as the feelings they’re left with. Anton Yelchin, in one of his final roles, brings a restless physicality to Jake, a man caged in his own way of thinking. And Lucie Lucas’ bold performance is made iconic through some Nouvelle Vague framing – especially in an extraordinary eyes-across-the-room cafĂ© scene. Executive produced by Jim Jarmusch and featuring a brief vocal performance by Chantal Akerman, director Gabe Klinger follows his 2013 documentary Double Play: James Benning and Richard Linklater with this ravishing debut fiction feature combining the textures of 35mm,16mm and Super8 film formats to question the verisimilitude of love, and of film itself.

Kate Taylor

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 284: Tue Oct 11

Hell Drivers (Endfield, 1957): BFI Southbank, NFT1, 6.15pm



60th LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (5th-16th October 2016) DAY 7
 
Every day (from October 5th to October 16th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

Time Out review:
Energetic and violent trucking thriller marked by the raw, angry edge of the best of blacklist victim Endfield's Hollywood work, and by his appreciation (shared, oddly enough, by fellow exile Joseph Losey) of the markedly out-of-the-mainstream talent of Stanley Baker. Playing an ex-con hired as one of a team of drivers forced to drive at dangerous speeds in rattletrap lorries over rugged roads to meet the daily quota of loads to be delivered (a touch of The Wages of Fear here), Baker further becomes involved in a deadly duel with a sadistic rival (Patrick McGoohan) on his way to smashing the haulage company's racket.

Paul Taylor


The VistaVision fine grain positive of the full-length British release version was scanned at 6K to capture the image detail. The sound has been remastered from the best original 35mm source.

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 283: Mon Oct 10

Lovetrue (Har'el, 2016): BFI Southbank, NFT3, 3.45pm



60th LONDON FILM FESTIVAL (5th-16th October 2016) DAY 6
 
Every day (from October 5th to October 16th) I will be selecting the London Film Festival choices you have a chance to get tickets for and the movies you are unlikely to see in London very soon unless you go to see them at the Festival. Here is the LFF's main website for the general information you need. Don't worry if some of the recommended films are sold out by the time you read this as there are always some tickets on offer which go on sale 30 minutes before each screening. Here is all the information you need about the best way to get tickets.

This film also screens at LFF on October 8th. Details here.

LFF introduction:Following her groundbreaking debut Bombay Beach (2011), director Alma Har’el returns with another genre-bending gem about our perception of love and relationships. We enter the psyches of three young people: Blake, an Alaskan stripper reflecting on her budding relationship and wondering how long she can carry on the job; Coconut Willie, a Hawaiian surfer who discovers he’s not the biological father of his son; and Victory, a young black woman in New York City pondering family bonds and faith. Har’el smartly interlaces these real-life stories with actors playing the protagonists at different stages of their lives, interspersed with exquisite choreography that subtly blur the boundaries between reality and fantasy. The result is a multi-layered, deeply atmospheric and poetic viewing experience, graced with a hypnotic soundtrack by Flying Lotus that will leave you questioning the myth of True Love.
Laura Bonville 

Here (and above) is the trailer.