Saturday, 25 June 2016

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 198: Sun Jul 17

The Asphalt Jungle (Huston, 1950): Regent Street Cinema, 4.50pm


Chicago Reader review:
John Huston's bleak, semidocumentary account of a jewel heist and its moral consequences. One of the first big caper films, this 1950 feature contributed much to the essence of the genre in its meticulous observation of planning and execution. But Huston's interest remains with his characters, who dissolve as tragically as the prospectors of The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and the adventurers of The Man Who Would Be King. The film has been remade at least three times, as The Badlanders, Cairo, and Cool Breeze. With Sam Jaffe, Sterling Hayden, Louis Calhern, Jean Hagen, James Whitmore, and an early appearance by Marilyn Monroe. 
Dave Kehr

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 197: Sat Jul 16

The Tingler (Castle, 1959): BFI Southbank, NFT2, 8.40pm


This film is part of the Cult strand at BFI Southbank and is also being shown on July 14th. You can find the full details here.

Chicago Reader review:
Fine hokum from William Castle, the 50s master of the low-budget thriller. Vincent Price discovers the monster that makes you scream—it lives in your spinal column, and it's an ugly little sucker. When the film was first released in 1959, Castle outdid himself by wiring all the seats in the theaters; when the Tingler escaped, you knew it. Now that's entertainment.

Dave Kehr

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 196: Fri Jul 15

Five Easy Pieces (Rafelson, 1970): Prince Charles Cinema, 6.25pm


This 35mm screening is part of the 'Check The Gate' season at the Prince Charles, dedicated to presenting films on film that will run at the cinema from 9th July to August 20th.

Time Out review:
Jack Nicholson was never going to be another Jimmy Stewart. As early as his prefame days (in 1960s TV Westerns and Roger Corman cheapies), there was too much attitude, too much snarl.
Instead, he became the symbolic actor of the counterculture; his Hollywood ascent was as much a signal of change as the rises of Coppola and Scorsese. Five Easy Pieces, a brilliant gem of American psychological realism (where are these movies today?), is Nicholson’s arrival to the A-list. His Bobby Dupea flees a privileged upbringing, replacing it with grimy work in oil fields; there’s some serious denial here, some buried self-contempt.
The beauty of the film, though, co-written by director Bob Rafelson and Carole Eastman (credited as Adrien Joyce), is that it avoids that contempt for its characters. Bobby’s fun-loving girlfriend, Rayette, is mental leagues beneath him, but as brought to life by the boisterous Karen Black, you immediately come to love her Tammy Wynette obduracy and pouty fits. Improbably, the two head back to Bobby’s wealthy home, to make peace with his dying father and stroll down the piano keys of our hero’s prodigy past. The movie is best known for a classic tell-off in a diner, but watch Nicholson’s eyes as he says it. The man is damaged and needs help.
Joshua Rothkopf

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 195: Thu Jul 14

Shivers (Cronenberg, 1975): Barbican Cinema, 8.30pm


This 35mm screening is part of the Experiments in Living season at the Barbican Centre. You can reed the full details here.

Chicago Reader review:
David Cronenberg made his commercial debut with this aggressively unpleasant 1975 horror film on the theme of sexual disgust. A swinging-singles apartment building is overrun by slimy little creatures who carry an exotic form of VD. Hard, if not impossible, to take, the film nevertheless represents a major turning point in the genre—the discovery of the body itself as a source of terror. Cronenberg's later films are superior in technique, though not necessarily in intensity.
Dave Kehr

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Friday, 24 June 2016

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 194: Wed Jul 13

Office Killer (Sherman, 1996): Prince Charles Cinema, 6.30pm


The Final Girls is a screening series focused on exploring feminist themes in horror cinema and highlighting the representation and work of women in horror, both in front of and behind the camera. Tonight's is a rare presentation of Cindy Sherman's only movie.

Chicago Reader review:
The makers of this pretentiously lit and composed item obviously had aspirations beyond the video store. They apparently intended this formulaic 1996 slasher to be some sort of wry comment on its genre, but it contains no humor or even commentary—instead of subverting conventions it just plods through them. Carol Kane plays a put-upon copy editor who cracks after accidentally killing a superior who'd treated her badly; she starts to kill deliberately, redecorating with grisly souvenirs the house she shares with her demanding mother. Naturally, an incestuous past is revealed in flashbacks, which are even lovelier than the rest of the visuals. The publicity actually promotes this project as having had its origins in a “cocktail party conversation”—as if that were surprising—between photographer Cindy Sherman, who directed, and producer Christine Vachon. Written by Tom Kalin (Swoon) and Elise MacAdam; with Jeanne Tripplehorn, Molly Ringwald, and Barbara Sukowa.

Lisa Alspector

Here (and above) is the trailer.

Thursday, 23 June 2016

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 193: Tue Jul 12

Thelma & Louise (Scott, 1991): Prince Charles Cinema, 8.15pm


This 35mm screening is part of the 'Check The Gate' season at the Prince Charles, dedicated to presenting films on film that will run at the cinema from 9th July to August 20th.

Check the Gate is a collaborative celebration of the big screen celluloid experience with a touring programme produced by some of the nation’s finest independent programmers, journalists and film fans. Capital Celluloid, Cigarette Burns Cinema, The Badlands Collective, The Bechdel Test Fest, Tim Robey (The Telegraph), Tom Huddleston (Time Out), Sandra Hebron (National Film & Television School) and the team at The Prince Charles Cinema are a few of the curators who have scoured Park Circus’ extensive collection of film prints to compile a diverse programme united by a common passion for film screenings.


Chicago Reader review:
A coffee-shop waitress (Susan Sarandon) and a beleaguered housewife (Geena Davis) in the southern sticks take off for a weekend holiday and eventually find themselves fleeing the law and society in a buoyant feminist road movie (1991) directed by Ridley Scott from a script by Callie Khouri. Scott, who usually offers a style in search of a subject, makes the most of the southwestern landscapes in handsome 'Scope framing and shows an uncharacteristic flair for comedy in fleshing out Khouri's script with a memorable cast of male rednecks (including Harvey Keitel, Michael Madsen, Christopher McDonald, Stephen Tobolowsky, Brad Pitt, and Timothy Carhart); his eye may get a little fancy and fussy in spots, but this is still one of his better pictures after Blade Runner, and Sarandon and Davis bring a lot of unpredictable verve and nuance to their parts.
Jonathan Rosenbaum
Here (and above) is the trailer.

Wednesday, 22 June 2016

Capital Celluloid 2016 - Day 192: Mon Jul 11

Old Joy (Reichardt, 2006): Prince Charles Cinema, 6.30pm


This is part of a Kelly Reichardt season at the Prince Charles. Full details here.

Chicago Reader review:
Two old pals, hoping to renew their friendship as they approach middle age, drive into the Oregon wilderness in search of a mountain spring, but the natural purity they find there only accentuates the compromises of their everyday lives. This quiet, elegiac road movie hinges on a few beautifully underplayed scenes between Daniel London and Will Oldham, but director Kelly Reichardt enlarges their emotional context with long stretches of western scenery pouring through the windows of London's car as he drives. As greenery gives way to industrial landscape and daylight fades into night, the two travelers' exhausted relationship begins to mirror a nation's spent ambition.
JR Jones

Here (and above) is the trailer.